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Contemporary Conversations

ArtPrize Artist Feature: Kyd Kane

Kyd Kane is a poet and spoken word artist from Grand Rapids, MI. Kane's most recent work, broke(n)hunger is an original spoken word poem that reflects on the artist's own experiences with food and her connections to and observations of food systems. Kyd Kane will also perform an original work, Communing Hearts, as a welcome to the Heartside Community Meal: A Public Art Project by Seitu Jones

Tell us a little about the work that’s on display at UICA. Have you participated in ArtPrize before? What drew you to participate this year?

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broke(n)hunger is a spoken word performance piece aimed to shed light on the issue of hunger in the United States. I am trying to expose audiences to the world of spoken word poetry by combining it with visual arts and using an intense subject, such as hunger, allows me to do just that. This piece walks audiences through the many different layers that make up the hunger epidemic in our nation and encourages them to get involved to help break it.

I have been interested in visual arts for some time and have dabbled in it here and there but this is by far the most in depth visual work I’ve done to date. The transition wasn’t difficult once I completed the poem. There were a lot of visual elements that just came naturally through the words. The biggest struggle was narrowing down my ideas. There was so much I could do with the piece, it was tough deciding on a single direction to take it.

UICA’s exhibition is centered around food. Does your work use food as a theme or lens traditionally or is this new territory for you?

While the food theme is new in my work, the lens I used to address it is very familiar. It’s more like food for thought. My work focuses on my individual journey for learning and growth. I try to use my words to encourage my audience to dig deep within, until acknowledgment of self becomes second nature. That’s been the most important part of my journey and has brought about so much personal evolution. I hope my poetry inspires others to do the same.

Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?

Everything I do is in accordance to cultivating my best existence. Each day, I am touched by someone or something that makes me take a look at what that means. The change in my perception of thought came when I was introduced to the practice of mindfulness. I was in search of living beyond my circumstances and practicing mindfulness opened up a level of strength within that allowed me to do so. Through mindfulness and meditation I was able to discover the power of the mind and how strong positive thinking is. Thoughts become things is a recurring theme in my poetry because it has become my way of life.

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Where else have you exhibited your work? Is there a project or exhibition that stands out in your mind as your greatest accomplishment?

Opening the door for my art to be a part of anything significant is an accomplishment in itself. Having the opportunity to share my words in spaces where spoken word has never been or isn’t traditionally presented, has allowed me to expand my reach in ways that I could have never imagined. There isn’t one performance that stands out more than another because they’ve been so diverse but I will say, my relationship with UICA has been a catalyst for some of my most memorable experiences.

What new projects do you have on the horizon?

I am looking forward to the release of my first book, titled “Sh*t Kyd Said”, in early 2018. It’s a collection of my work over the past 2 years. It will include many of my known performance pieces as well as a lot of unreleased works. In addition to that, I am currently working on expanding my visual arts work, taking my poetry from the page to the canvas. I’m excited to be partnering with local galleries to showcase my work and make it available to the public.

Looking for more?

Learn more about the artist here.
#kydsaidit

Kyd Kane
broke(n)hunger                
Category:  Time-based                
Vote Code: 65946
Current City: Grand Rapids, MI, US

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ArtPrize Artist Feature: Michael Peoples

Michael Peoples is a self-taught artist whose works reflect on the cultural history of the Midwest with a comedic bend. Peoples has been experimenting with mold-making for several years, primarily casting in wax and creating work using multiples and repetition. Each work explores the significance of number, color, and form upon cognitive and emotional experience. Perchance to Dream reflects the idea of food as memory. 

For Peoples, some foods have developed an iconic status in the collective consciousness, such as the well-known Circus Peanut candy. The subtext of this work derives from the fondness that Peoples' grandfather had for the peanut-shaped candies and Perchance to Dream is an homage to his memory.

Tell us a little bit about the work that's on display at UICA.

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Perchance to Dream is a multicolored river of circus peanuts molded in paraffin and crayon. It is displayed on sixty feet of raised platforms designed to cantilever with the exit ramp of the UICA. 

My grandfather loved circus peanuts, this piece is an homage to my memories of him. Beyond that I'd like to leave the story line of the installation open to the viewer. Sometimes it is easy to get lost in a works meaning, I have been molding this one for several years now and to me it has a myriad of interpretations.

You've participated in ArtPrize before (including at UICA!). What drew you to participate this year?

I have played multiple roles in the event throughout it's history. It is a love/hate relationship on so many levels. I would have to say that this opportunity to bring artists to our community and the ability to work with them firsthand has been vital to the growth of my own work. 

UICA's former curator, Heather Duffy, is wonderfully persuasive and to be a part of her last exhibition at UICA was quite an honor. I had been aware of her idea of curating a show around the theme of food for a while and had proposed this work early on. 

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Artprize is a popular city wide event. What are you most excited about during this unique art viewing experience?

The dynamic of the event changes from year to year, so each year seems to bring new experiences. 

UICA's exhibit is centered around food. Does your work use food as a theme or lens traditionally or is this new territory for you?

Actually, I have worked in restaurants (on some scale) for around 25 years now. Many of the processes I work within are based on my experience in kitchens and with the dynamics of food. 

What has been your single biggest influence on your way of thinking?

 An understanding, intelligent partner along with a tight knit community of artists. 

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Where else have you exhibited your work? Is there a project or exhibition that stands out in your mind as your greatest accomplishment?

I tend to focus on exhibiting regionally. This gives me the opportunity to concentrate on the work. There is a fragility to much of what I do. 

What new projects do you have on the horizon?

This project, Perchance to Dream will be in an exhibition at the Muskegon Museum of Art at the beginning of summer 2018. This is one of a series of works that I have that continues to expand and the iteration in Muskegon will be substantially larger. I have also participated in several exhibits at Tom Duimstra's incubator, 337 Project Space - this space really allows me to show my newer, more experimental work.

Looking for more?

Learn more about the artist here.

Michael Peoples
Perchance To Dream
Category: Installation                
Vote Code: 66441
Current City: Grand Haven, MI, US

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ArtPrize Artist Feature: Danielle Riede

Danielle Riede’s work is on view as part of UICA's ArtPrize Nine exhibition, Cultivate, a curated group show that uses food as a lens to examine cultural history, social equity, and the effects of globalization on communities.

Danielle Felice Riede grew up in the United States and Iceland. She received her Master of Fine Arts in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University and also studied under Daniel Buren at the Kunstakademie Duesseldorf. As an undergraduate student, Danielle completed her Bachelor of Arts, with a major in art and a minor in art history, at the University of Virginia. Riede also lived in Italy for four years and studied figure drawing at Accademia di Belle Arte di Firenze. Since 2003, Danielle has been making site-specific installations out of recuperated materials. Her international exhibition record includes galleries and museums in Mexico City, Athens, Cologne, New York, and many other cities. Danielle Felice Riede is the recipient of numerous awards including the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Fellowship and the Virginia Commission for the Arts Fellowship in Sculpture. She is currently an Associate Professor of Art at the Herron School of Art and Design - Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis.

Tell us a little about the work that’s on display at UICA.

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In the winter of 2013-2014 I created an installation called “Tears and Rain” out of screens from discarded televisions, computers and tablets. “Quench” is a new version of that installation, but this time I am playing with video projections of water on those screens.  Water soothes and relaxes. The work has the elemental properties of our computers, televisions and tablets, but I am using them in a different way. I am hoping that the work connects the viewer to their senses.

Most of the videos were taken in beautiful national parks in the United States and Canada. 

I’m grateful for the help of RecycleForce with this project.  They pointed me to the material and helped me gather it.  They are an Indianapolis-based non profit offering recycling services and providing job placement for formerly incarcerated individuals.

What drew you to participate in ArtPrize this year? 

I’ve actually never participated in ArtPrize, but I’m very excited to participate this year.  I love the openness of ArtPrize and the fact that it brings such a diverse group of artists and spectators from around the world.  I’m excited to be participating and honored to be part of the “Cultivate” exhibition at UICA as the theme of the show aligns so closely with my values.

UICA’s exhibition is centered around food. Does your work use food as a theme or lens traditionally or is this new territory for you?

In some ways this is new territory for me in my art.  I have been thinking about water, technology and biological systems, but hadn’t thought so specifically about the relationship of water to human life until talking to the curator of the show.  However, I did do a project at an abandoned home called “Sustainable Growths” for which I used food and art to bring the neighbors together.  The primary focus of the project was an installation composed of recycled domestic items on the house, but when I realized that the neighborhood residents had difficulty accessing healthy food and after school activities, I began giving workshops for the neighborhood kids and incorporating healthy snacks like fresh produce into them.  The project culminated in a neighborhood cookout at the site and it was so much fun.

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Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?

I love being an observer of the world and just being part of this amazing planet.  I usually get inspiration and ideas for work when I’m not looking for them.  For example, finding the material I’m using here is the result of working with RecycleForce on another project and many of the vidoes that are projected on the screens were taken with my cell phone because something beautiful surprised me when I wasn’t expecting it.

Where else have you exhibited your work? Is there a project or exhibition that stands out in your mind as your greatest accomplishment?

I have exhibited my work at galleries and museums in New York, Berlin, Cologne, Athens, Mexico City, and smaller cities in Scottland, France and Italy.  I feel like the project on the abandoned home in Indianapolis may have been my biggest accomplishment though.  It’s hard to say.  I feel fortunate to be a working artist.

What new projects do you have on the horizon?

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My “Wingspan” paintings are so much fun to make and I am working with Garvey Simon Art Access in New York and a curator in France to connect those works to the public. 

I also want to continue working with non-profits in Indianapolis to help develop after school art programs in neighborhoods that need them.  I am also working on developing my installation, “Unwound”, which is made of repurposed domestic items like wreaths. 

Looking for more?

Learn more about the artist here.

Danielle Riede
Quench
Category: Installation
Vote Code: 66504
Current City: Indianapolis, IN, US

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ArtPrize Artist Feature: Seitu Jones

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Working independently or with others, Seitu Jones has created over 30 large-scale public artworks and was millennium artist-in-residence for 651 Arts in Brooklyn, NY and was the City of Minneapolis’ first Artist-in-Residence. Jones has been awarded a number of prestigious designations and currently teaches Urban Food Systems at the University of Minnesota and is on the faculty of Goddard College in Port Townsend, WA.

On September 23, Heartside residents are invited to take part in a community meal presented by Seitu Jones, UICA, and a number of community partners. Guests of the event will enjoy a meal prepared by Grand Rapids chefs with ingredients cultivated from local gardens and farms on a tablescape designed by Seitu Jones and created by students, collaborators, and volunteers. 

The 250-seat community meal will unite neighbors, illuminate similarities and connections, and encourage guests to share food stories and participate in over the table conversations about food traditions, attitudes, food justice, rituals, and access while celebrating our diverse neighborhood.

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Have you participated in ArtPrize before? What drew you to participate this year?

This is the first time I’ve participated in ArtPrize and was drawn to create the Collard Green Shrine as a part of the Heartside meal commission.

ArtPrize is a popular, city-wide event. What are you most excited about during this unique art-viewing experience?

I’m excited to see and experience the work of artists from around the globe.

UICA’s exhibition is centered around food. Does your work use food as a theme or lens traditionally or is this new territory for you?

I’ve been working almost my entire career to blend art and nature and began to explore the food system. It is my goal as an artist to make the invisible, visible and I attempt to do that with the food system by making artistic interventions.

Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?

My family’s food traditions, George Washington Carver, and the Black Panther Party’s free breakfast program.

Where else have you exhibited your work? Is there a project or exhibition that stands out in your mind as your greatest accomplishment?

While I’ve exhibited across the country, I’ve created Collard Green Shrines at Project Rowhouse in Houston, TX; Bates College Museum in Lewsiston, ME and the University Research and Outreach Center. My most important work is always the piece I’m working on right now.

What new projects do you have on the horizon?

I’m completing the construction of a research vessel for the Mississippi River in the Twin Cities. The boat will be a floating sculpture designed to monitor and observe the health of the river.

Looking for more?

The Heartside Community Meal is an official ArtPrize Nine entry in the time-based category. Cultivate, UICA's ArtPrize Nine exhibition, is a curated group show that uses food as a lens to examine cultural history, social equity, and the effects of globalization on communities. 

Seitu Jones      
The Heartside Community Meal
Category: Time-based                                
Vote Code: 66414
Current City: St. Paul, MN, U

Print

ArtPrize Artist Feature: Artemis Antippas

Chicken (family portrait), 2014, archival pigment print, 12 x 18 inches

Chicken (family portrait), 2014, archival pigment print, 12 x 18 inches

Artemis Antippas’ work is on view as part of UICA's ArtPrize Nine exhibition, Cultivate, a curated group show that uses food as a lens to examine cultural history, social equity, and the effects of globalization on communities.

Artemis Antippas was born in 1985 to Greek-American parents; an abstract painter mother and an art dealer father. From a very early age, Artemis became consumed with the wildness that is New Orleans, especially the French Quarter where she grew up. She graduated from American University in 2008, where she received her BA in Public Communications and Art History.

Since 2014, Artemis has exhibited her work throughout the country including Brooklyn, NY, Boulder, CO, Lake Charles, LA, and Washington, DC, as well as several exhibitions in New Orleans including the Ogden Museum of Southern Art, the Contemporary Arts Center and Prospect satellite exhibitions.

Artemis makes work that is a reflection of her intense connection to New Orleans and her various obsessions – obsession with color, glitter, fried chicken, with her grandmother, with soccer, dollar store foods, her cat, with New Orleanians' unrelenting tendencies of fête and food, with multiples, old lady things, party decorations, apparel & accessories, with carpeting, Mardi Gras, cotton candy, shopping, fur, and with all things Greek.

Artemis' practice revolves around these obsessions, personal interests and daily observations. For her, the adventure and experimentation of the working process are equally as exciting as the finished work itself. Artemis Antippas lives and works in New Orleans, LA.

Tell us a little about the work that’s on display at UICA. Have you participated in ArtPrize before? What drew you to participate this year?

This is my first time participating in ArtPrize and I am so thrilled to be a part of such a wonderful celebration of the arts! On display at UICA, I have a few separate works arranged as one installation. A big part of my art making process is exploring unusual materials – the work in this show involves chicken bones, silicone, motorized turntables, videos of me eating chicken and loads of glitter.

Glitter Bones (for New Orleans), chicken bones, fine glitter, steel nails

Glitter Bones (for New Orleans), chicken bones, fine glitter, steel nails

ArtPrize is a popular, city-wide event. What are you most excited about during this unique art-viewing experience?

I think what I’m most excited about is the opportunity to exhibit my work in Grand Rapids at UICA and to share my work with such an incredible art-loving community for the very first time.

UICA’s exhibition is centered around food. Does your work use food as a theme or lens traditionally or is this new territory for you?

Food is absolutely an influence in my work. I’m from New Orleans, so fried chicken is like a way of life down here. No matter the occasion, a fancy gala or a block party, there is always fried chicken. I’m sure it sounds strange, but I feel very connected to fried chicken and know that it will always play a major role in future works.

Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?

I was born and raised in the French Quarter, so I was exposed to absolutely everything as a child. I saw what it meant for people to be who they were, completely free of judgment or fear – it was a beautiful way to grow up. I am in complete of awe of this wild city and fall more and more in love with it every day. New Orleans will forever be a strong influence in everything I do.

Where else have you exhibited your work? Is there a project or exhibition that stands out in your mind as your greatest accomplishment?

I’ve shown my work around the country in various group shows (in Brooklyn, Boulder, Washington DC, etc.) as well as several incredible galleries, museums and art centers in New Orleans. Each time I get to share my work with the public it truly feels like a great accomplishment. Showing at ArtPrize is definitely a very exciting moment for me!

What new projects do you have on the horizon?

I always have a bunch of projects in the works, it can be overwhelming at times but I think I live off of the excitement of working without boundaries. And having the opportunity to actually share them with other people is just a big bonus for me. I have some really wonderful larger collaborative projects that I’m focusing on right now, too – so stay tuned!

Looking for more?

Learn more about Aremis Antippas here.

Artemis Antippas
C H C K N                    
Category: Installation
Vote Code: 66579
Current City: New Orleans, LA, US

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Local Artist Feature: adeshola makinde

Photograph by  Casey McClurken

Photograph by  Casey McClurken

Give us a short bio.

My name is adeshola makinde. I’m a clothing designer and I own a streetwear clothing brand called COMPLETE VII. I’m an artist working at a dream that I hope one day, can become a reality someday.

How would you describe your work?

I would say that my clothing design is an extension of how I’m feeling at the moment and how I’m dissecting the world. My first collection was a direct reflection of the political climate at the time, so it was quite confrontational. My second collection has a hint of that, but I believe it’s a far more approachable than the last collection. I always want COMPLETE VII to be a brand that has integrity in all the things that it does while having fun.

Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?

I don’t think I can honestly pin point that to a single person or thing, but what I’ve been inspired by a lot lately are all the amazing books I’ve been reading by some very important black people; the people they never taught us about in grade school. Everyone from James Baldwin to Huey P. Newton to Angela Davis and many more. Their courage and willingness to “fight the good fight” has been an inspiration for me to keep doing what I’m doing.

Do you have a piece of work which stands out in your mind as something you are exceptionally proud of or that is particularly important to you?

Photo by adeshola makinde. Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

Photo by adeshola makinde. Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

What immediately comes to mind is the ad campaign for my first collection. It was a photograph of two young black boys wearing my favorite piece from the first collection, the PLEASE DON’T SHOOT ME DOWN! hoodie. I’m proud of this ad campaign because even though it didn’t cause me to sell as many of these items as I would have liked, it at least pushed a few people to recognize or begin a conversation about something that is an problem in our society. The trend of unarmed black people dying at the hands of those called to protect and serve should be confronted proactively. I want to thank my friend for allowing his kids to be apart of my “crazy” idea and for his kids to be so excited about it – your support, but more importantly your constant pursuit to show empathy humbles me.

Photo by adeshola makinde. Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

Photo by adeshola makinde. Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

What new projects do you have on the horizon?

I’m actually on the verge of unveiling my second collection in an INSTALLATION © sort of event. The concept for the INSTALLATION © is to basically give customers the opportunity to touch & feel the new collection before they pre-order anything they liked online. Whatever they buy will then be delivered to them (no longer than 3 weeks) once it has been made right here in town. It is also allowing us to tell the story of the new collection a bit more comprehensively with the install that we plan to do in the space ArtCommons space at UICA. The event will happen August 18 & 19 from 12PM-7PM both days. There will be an opening reception on the first night, August 18 from 5PM-7PM. I really would love for anybody and everybody to come to this public event – I really believe in this next collection and I think the community will enjoy it too.

What do you want others outside of the creative workforce to understand about careers within the arts?

When people walk into museums or even just look at a t-shirt design and say “I could’ve done that!” might be one of my biggest pet peeves. Sometimes art can look so simple and easy, but to me, it’s all about the action, of doing that sets people apart. Some people say they’re going to do something, but never do it and then you have people that actually do it. Chasing any dream is no easy task, but the first step is going after it and that's not something that everyone who’s had a dream can say that they’ve done. That’s what I want people outside of the creative workforce to understand about careers within the arts – that it isn’t as easy as it may seem.

How can communities, specifically Grand Rapids, better support the creative workforce?

Photo by adeshola makinde. Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

Photo by adeshola makinde. Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

One thing that I’ve been talking about lately with others is that there are all of the extremely creative people that have left Grand Rapids. A lot of times those people left because they weren’t supported in the ways that I believe Grand Rapids could have supported them - to help facilitate their ideas. Often times it seems like it’s the same ole' thing that succeeds in Grand Rapids and I think as a city, we can to do a better job at supporting what is new and/or what we may not understand. I love breweries as much as the next person, but I don’t think another one is what we need/ what will allow for us to be a progressive city. We need more diversity in the cultural spaces in our city. From types of restaurants, to retail shops, to bars, to music venues (and the list goes on). This is all to say that I’ve always been one to believe that Grand Rapids could be an amazing creative hub, one that is viewed as being somewhere interesting. In my eyes, we have the talent, Grand Rapids just needs to find a way to help creatives facilitate their ideas!

What are you passionate about besides your work?

Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

Designed in collaboration with Ben Biondo

I’m passionate about music, movies and tv shows. I get chills whenever I hear music that I love and/or touches my soul. I love watching movies and tv shows that tell unique stories that you can relate to your everyday life or find inspiration from, but I also just love when they are just shot super well. All of these things inspire me to keep creating and hopefully one day I can inspire someone with my work the way these things have all inspired me.

What’s the best piece of advice you have heard and repeat to others?

Someone who I collaborate with a lot is Ben Biondo – he’s who I send all my sketches and/or references to and he translates my ideas into something tangible via Adobe Illustrator. That’s a program I’m not experienced with (but he is) and he helps me bring my ideas to life. This is advice that’s not necessarily something that I’ve heard, but more so something that I’ve observed. All of the people (i.e. Frank Ocean) that inspire me that I follow in pop culture have one thing in common and that’s their ability to delegate. Know your strengths and weaknesses and delegate tasks to those who can support those weaknesses. The people who inspire me seem to know how to collaborate very well. That’s advice I’d tell anyone – find people who you work well with (those who are good at the things you aren’t) and work, work, work...

Looking for more?

Follow adeshola makinde at @completevii or visit  COMPLETE-VII.COM.

Local Artist Feature: Brian Hedrick

Tell us about you.

I was born and raised in Grand Rapids, MI and I’ve lived near downtown for about seven years. I studied graphic design at Kendall College of Art and Design, and while in school I got really involved with the local music community. When I wasn’t doing schoolwork, I was designing gig posters and album art for local musicians. In 2013 I started working with the folks over at Lamp Light Music Festival and have been doing design work for the festival for the last four years. Shortly after I graduated from KCAD, I got an internship at Downtown Grand Rapids Inc., and was brought on full time as their in-house graphic designer, and I’ve been working there for the last three years. 

What originally made you want to become a graphic designer?

Photography was my first creative outlet. I was really drawn to the challenge of creating compositions in the viewfinder – the restricted space forced me to look at my surroundings in a new way, and I loved that. In high school I started to learn the ropes of the Adobe programs, and I found that I could create similar compositions within a “restricted space” on a screen. I spent a lot of time on the computer. My skills in the programs sharpened over the years, but the work I was producing was a direct result of presets, and consequently felt confined and shallow. It wasn’t until KCAD where my perception of graphic design really blossomed and I started to grasp the capacity of design beyond the computer. I fell in love with typography, language and theory. 

How would you describe your approach to design?

A mentor introduced me to a way of thinking that has really guided me over the years. It’s this idea of zooming in and zooming out while you work - shifting between the intricacies of the design process and the bigger picture. At the end of the day, designers have to make important decisions like, what typeface should I use? What should my margin size be? What colors should I use? This is the zoom in. But what’s on the other side of that? How do I escape the damnation of shuffling through my font book?  How am I justifying those small decisions, are they purely instinctual? How can I create work that is less contrived, and more revealing? 

The world is rich with embedded contexts, and I try to view those contexts as a guide for decision-making. They are tools just as the Adobe programs are tools. How can I utilize historical, cultural, or economical contexts in my daily design practice to help construct a more meaningful message? How can I offer a fresh perspective on topics that already exist, or bend light that is already shining, so to speak? This is the zoom out. I try to center myself between those mindsets, and shift back and forth when the time calls for it. 

Who or what has been the biggest single influence on your way of thinking?

Mundane things that stop you in your tracks and make you go “huh, weird”. I love that stuff. A handful of months ago I was out to breakfast, and as I was waiting in line I noticed a letter board that read “OPEN 7 AM – 2 PM DAILY”, and instead of using a L in DAILY they used an upside down 7, presumably because they ran out of L’s to use. It was totally one of those “huh, weird” moments. It was an organic, clever use of typography that came out of necessity and urgency. Made me think, well what if I found myself in a situation that required me to create form out of necessity or urgency, what would that look like? What if I’m working on a project down the line where the content of said project suggests similar characteristics? Could I back-pocket this process and unearth it when it’s pertinent? This just one example, but more or less I’m just really intrigued with the idea of emulating mundane, organic processes and seeing how that could inform my own design process.

What would you say is your strongest skill and how have you honed that skill over the years?

I try to stay observant of my surroundings, whether it is immediate or distant, in or outside the field of design. I don’t know if it’s my strongest skill, but it is definitely a skill I’m trying to hone in more. I want to have my finger on the pulse. 

What do you want others outside of the creative workforce to understand about careers within the arts?